The Fashion Act is the most decisive step that fashion could take towards the environment

The Fashion Act is the most decisive step that fashion could take towards the environment

Courtesy of Press OfficeImaxtree

Acceleration in fashion is a constant. If the pandemic had, albeit for a moment, canceled that perennial feeling of rush and achievement, the fashion industry soon returned to its old habits. The collections of the big brands, however far removed from the canonical calendars, are nevertheless numerous – and now more than ever thanks to the growing trend of co-branding, the fusion of one or more brands united to create flash collections proof of social ecstasy – and they contribute every day to fill an already saturated market. The environment continues to suffer. More and more measures are being taken by small and large brands, which, through the procurement of raw materials made according to strict standards, slower production rates, lower volumes of garments and accessories produced, lighten the impact that this huge industry has on the world. A decisive step, however, seems to have been taken by the state of New York, with the Fashion Act.

fashion act cos è

Courtesy of Press OfficeImaxtree

To cope with the lack of transparency that generally characterizes the sector, the Fashion Act will ensure that large manufacturers – specifically, fashion companies with a turnover of 100 million dollars, globally – are obliged to track at least 50% of their supply chains but not only, analyze the use of the materials used in production, as well as the production chain itself – even the salary of employees is in fact one of the topics covered to be protected. Setting goals therefore means putting in place a more organized mechanism for the first time, pushing the fashion industry to make itself less impenetrable and more transparent. In fact, the aim is to invite companies that do not currently regulate themselves according to environmental protection principles to do so. Written by the New Standard Institute, a non-profit organization focused on sustainability in the fashion industry, the Fashion Sustainability and Social Accountability Act (the Fashion Act for short) has found favor with Alessandra Biaggi, a senator from the state of New York, and Anna R. Kelles, member of the assembly. Another great supporter of the Fashion Act, which has always promoted sensitive campaigns and production methods, is the American designer Stella McCartney. Pending approval, this law could be an epochal turning point for fashion – every company, in fact, for failure to comply with the regulations dictated by the act, could incur penalties equal to 2% of earnings. All that remains is to wait for the next developments, in the hope that New York is only the first of many states ready to act.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Cookie

This website has updated its privacy policy in compliance with changes to European Union data protection law, for all members globally. We’ve also updated our Privacy Policy to give you more information about your rights and responsibilities with respect to your privacy and personal information. Please read this to review the updates about which cookies we use and what information we collect on our site. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our updated privacy policy.